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The Strongest Cloaking Yet – Cross Domain Canonical Tag

For years the most advanced forms of bot detection, ip delivery, javascript and flash obfuscation, etc. have been employed by blackhat search engine optimizers to accomplish cloaking. These techniques, when used successfully, would allow the webmaster to pull the wool over the eyes of bots and feed sales-heavy (or worse) content to end users. Google has fought valiantly to stop these techniques and, by and large, has removed all but the most sophisticated techniques. However, they have fallen on their own sword with the introduction of the new cross-domain canonical tag. The Canonical Tag The rel=canonical tag was a god-send for most webmasters. It allowed us to defeat duplicate content issues by placing a single line of code at the top of the HTML page, unbeknown...

LinkSleeve Moved to New Server

Excitingly, LinkSleeve, the distributed anti-link-spam service offered for free by Virante, has been moved to a new dedicated server. We have also updated the codebase to use a new database schema that should up response speeds and lower outages. No tags for this post.

The Triviality of On-Page HTML Tag Optimization

I have long speculated that on-page optimization was trivial. It meshed with my understanding of how a suspicious Google engineer may treat the content of a page in relationship to its rankings. Why trust anything a webmaster says about his or her content (keywords stuffed into H1, meta, or bold tags)? Why trust anything on a page that a user won’t get to preview before visiting (anything outside the Title and Meta-Description, by-and-large)? However, despite my speculations, I lacked the data to truly start making conclusions about the usage of keywords in specific tags. Until now. First, I am pleased to say that our micro-experimentation has found similar results to SEOMoz’s macro-experimentation. In particular, their finding that the H1 tag was no...

NoFollow and PageRank Sculpting Roundup: Changes and Implications

Matt Cutts has decided to reveal a little more about Google’s internal changes that brought upon debate regarding the use of the NoFollow tag and PageRank Sculpting. While there has been quite a bit of discussion, I wanted to take a moment to wrap up what has happened and what the implications of these are for white and black-hat techniques. What Has Changed Think of your webpage as a water tower and links as pipes from that water tower to other smaller water towers. Historically, a “nofollow” tag was like capping the one of the pipes so that no water would flow to the terminating water tower. Google has changed this, though. Instead of capping the pipe, they merely divert it into the abyss. The link still impacts your page’s ability to...

PageRank Sculpting is Dead, Long Live PageRank Sculpting

Update: This is a RePost after our Database Lost Some Recent Posts. Our suspicions have been verified. PageRank Sculpting still works, just not with nofollow. This is in accordance with the original intent of nofollow, which was to tag untrustworthy links. The links you create and control on your own site to pages you create yourself are inherently trustworthy. The search marketing world is all abuzz with the latest from Matt Cutts that PageRank sculpting no longer works via the SMX Advanced conference. What Has Changed I think what is actually occurring is a far more simple, straightforward and, frankly, obvious update on behalf of the Google search team. This is the question I immediately asked myself upon hearing the news: why should the NUMBER of internal...

Silk Icon Set CSS: Using CSS Clipping and Optimized Silk Icon Image

First off, I have to start by saying I absolutely love FamFamFam.com’s free “Silk” icon set. It is unequivocally the most valuable set of free images I have ever used and I recommend if you use it you donate accordingly. With 1000 icons, each roughly 1KB in size, it is understandable how eventually it would get cumbersome for a web application interface using 20 to 30 of these icons at a time to continue to try to handle each of these images individually. Moreover, as often as these icons are used across the web, it made sense to me that the popular image-clipping CSS method might be valuable not just for my own web application development but others as well. What is the CSS Clipping Method and Why While I’m not the best at explaining...

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